EOS-Market / Wilkinson Europe LTD

Almost all firms and individuals offering, promoting or selling financial services or products in the UK have to be authorised by us.

However, some firms act without our authorisation and some knowingly run investment scams. 

This firm is not authorised by us and is targeting people in the UK. Based upon information we hold, we believe it is carrying on regulated activities which require authorisation.

EOS-Market

Address: Dreikönigstrasse 31A, CH-8002 Zurich, Canton of Zurich

Telephone numbers: UK: 44 121 3680478
Switzerland: 41 44 9746282
Sweden: 46 84 4689114
Australia: 61 87 1001424
Singapore: 65 3 1290747

Emails: 

[email protected]
[email protected]
Eric Milner – [email protected]
Ricardo Gonzales – [email protected]
Mark Giordano – [email protected]
Conor McCarthy – [email protected], [email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]

Website: www.eos-market.com

Name: Wilkinson Europe LTD (Company No. 10941105)

Addresses: 20-22 Wenlock Road, London, N1 7GU
PO Box 4385, Compaines House, Cardiff, CF14 8LH

Be aware that scammers may give out other false details or change their contact details over time to new email addresses, telephone numbers or physical addresses.

How to protect yourself

We strongly advise you to only deal with financial firms that are authorised by us, and check the Financial Services Register to ensure they are. It has information on firms and individuals that are, or have been, regulated by us.

If a firm does not appear on the Register but claims it does, contact our Consumer Helpline on 0800 111 6768.

There are more steps you should take to avoid scams and unauthorised firms.

If you use an unauthorised firm, you won’t have access to the Financial Ombudsman Service or Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS) so you’re unlikely to get your money back if things go wrong.

If you use an authorised firm, access to the Financial Ombudsman Service and FSCS protection will depend on the investment you are making and the service the firm is providing. If you would like further information about protection, the authorised firm should be able to help.

Report an unauthorised firm

If you think you have been approached by an unauthorised firm or contacted about a scam, you should contact our Consumer Helpline on 0800 111 6768. If you were offered, bought or sold shares, you can use our reporting form.

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Atecs Capital | FCA

Almost all firms and individuals offering, promoting or selling financial services or products in the UK have to be authorised by us.

However, some firms act without our authorisation and some knowingly run investment scams. 

This firm is not authorised by us and is targeting people in the UK. Based upon information we hold, we believe it is carrying on regulated activities which require authorisation.

Atecs Capital

Address: Altos Group Ltd, 8 Copthall, Roseau Valley, Commonwealth of Dominica,00152

Telephone: +44 2080-899386, 02038688937, 02038688923, 02039254558, 02036957664

Email: [email protected], [email protected], [email protected], [email protected], [email protected]

Website: https://atecscapital.com

Be aware that scammers may give out other false details or change their contact details over time to new email addresses, telephone numbers or physical addresses.

How to protect yourself

We strongly advise you to only deal with financial firms that are authorised by us, and check the Financial Services Register to ensure they are. It has information on firms and individuals that are, or have been, regulated by us.

If a firm does not appear on the Register but claims it does, contact our Consumer Helpline on 0800 111 6768.

There are more steps you should take to avoid scams and unauthorised firms.

If you use an unauthorised firm, you won’t have access to the Financial Ombudsman Service or Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS) so you’re unlikely to get your money back if things go wrong.

If you use an authorised firm, access to the Financial Ombudsman Service and FSCS protection will depend on the investment you are making and the service the firm is providing. If you would like further information about protection, the authorised firm should be able to help.

Report an unauthorised firm

If you think you have been approached by an unauthorised firm or contacted about a scam, you should contact our Consumer Helpline on 0800 111 6768. If you were offered, bought or sold shares, you can use our reporting form.

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Intrgroup / Mindworks Limited | FCA

Almost all firms and individuals offering, promoting or selling financial services or products in the UK have to be authorised by us.

However, some firms act without our authorisation and some knowingly run investment scams. 

This firm is not authorised by us and is targeting people in the UK. Based upon information we hold, we believe it is carrying on regulated activities which require authorisation.

Intrgroup / Mindworks Limited

Address: Suite 305, Griffith Corporate Centre, Beachmont, PO Box 1510, Kingstown, St Vincent and the Grenadines

Telephone numbers: +32-23201175
UK: +44-2080894076
BE: +32-23201175
NZ: +64-79856849
NE: +31-208084491
AU: +61-743317533

Email: [email protected], [email protected]

Website: https://intrgroup.com/

Be aware that scammers may give out other false details or change their contact details over time to new email addresses, telephone numbers or physical addresses.

How to protect yourself

We strongly advise you to only deal with financial firms that are authorised by us, and check the Financial Services Register to ensure they are. It has information on firms and individuals that are, or have been, regulated by us.

If a firm does not appear on the Register but claims it does, contact our Consumer Helpline on 0800 111 6768.

There are more steps you should take to avoid scams and unauthorised firms.

If you use an unauthorised firm, you won’t have access to the Financial Ombudsman Service or Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS) so you’re unlikely to get your money back if things go wrong.

If you use an authorised firm, access to the Financial Ombudsman Service and FSCS protection will depend on the investment you are making and the service the firm is providing. If you would like further information about protection, the authorised firm should be able to help.

Report an unauthorised firm

If you think you have been approached by an unauthorised firm or contacted about a scam, you should contact our Consumer Helpline on 0800 111 6768. If you were offered, bought or sold shares, you can use our reporting form.

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Hamilton FE / Hamiltonfe | FCA

Almost all firms and individuals offering, promoting or selling financial services or products in the UK have to be authorised by us.

However, some firms act without our authorisation and some knowingly run investment scams. 

This firm is not authorised by us and is targeting people in the UK. Based upon information we hold, we believe it is carrying on regulated activities which require authorisation.

Hamilton FE / Hamiltonfe

Address: 1574 Sofia, R.A, Hristo Smirnenski, 112 Geo Milev Str., Partner Floor, Office 1

Telephone: 3905119900459, 08081890219, 08081890137, 07723711752

Email: [email protected], [email protected], [email protected], [email protected]

Website: http://www.hamiltonfe.com/

Be aware that scammers may give out other false details or change their contact details over time to new email addresses, telephone numbers or physical addresses.

How to protect yourself

We strongly advise you to only deal with financial firms that are authorised by us, and check the Financial Services Register to ensure they are. It has information on firms and individuals that are, or have been, regulated by us.

If a firm does not appear on the Register but claims it does, contact our Consumer Helpline on 0800 111 6768.

There are more steps you should take to avoid scams and unauthorised firms.

If you use an unauthorised firm, you won’t have access to the Financial Ombudsman Service or Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS) so you’re unlikely to get your money back if things go wrong.

If you use an authorised firm, access to the Financial Ombudsman Service and FSCS protection will depend on the investment you are making and the service the firm is providing. If you would like further information about protection, the authorised firm should be able to help.

Report an unauthorised firm

If you think you have been approached by an unauthorised firm or contacted about a scam, you should contact our Consumer Helpline on 0800 111 6768. If you were offered, bought or sold shares, you can use our reporting form.

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Christopher Woolard appointed Interim Chief Executive of the FCA

Chris will take on the Chief Executive role following Andrew Bailey’s departure to become Governor of the Bank of England. Chris is currently the FCA’s Executive Director of Strategy and Competition and an Executive member of the FCA’s Board.

Charles Randell, the FCA’s chair, said:

‘I’m looking forward to working with Chris in his Interim Chief Executive role. I’m confident that he and Executive Committee colleagues will continue to deliver our ambitious plans for change in 2020 and beyond, building on the foundations laid by Andrew Bailey.’

Chris Woolard, said:

‘I’m delighted that I’ve been asked to take on this role. We have a huge job to do and I’m looking forward to working with the Board and colleagues across the FCA as we continue to deliver the FCA’s mission.’

Notes to editors

  • As Executive Director of Strategy and Competition, Chris is responsible for the FCA’s policy output, its work on innovation, competition and economics and for helping direct the strategy for the financial regulator. Chris joined the Financial Services Authority in 2013, to help lead the creation of the FCA. Before that, Chris worked at Ofcom (2009-2012), the BBC (2005-2009) and in the civil service (1995-2005).
  • Chris is also currently a non-executive member of the Payment Systems Regulator Board.
  • The Chief Executive of FCA is a public appointment made by HM Treasury.
  • HM Treasury will be running an open competition for the permanent Chief Executive and further details will be announced in due course.

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IPO-FX / Skylon Investments (clone of FCA recognised product and UK registered company)

Almost all firms and individuals carrying out financial services activities in the UK have to be authorised or registered by us. This firm is not authorised or registered by us but has been targeting people in the UK, claiming to be an authorised firm.

This is what we call a ‘clone firm’; and fraudsters usually use this tactic when contacting people out of the blue, so you should be especially wary if you have been cold called. They may use the name of the genuine firm, the ‘firm reference number’ (FRN) we have given the authorised firm or other details.

You can find out more about this scam tactic and how to protect yourself from clone firms.

Clone firm details

Fraudsters are using or giving out the following details as part of their tactics to scam people in the UK:

IPO-FX / Skylon Investments (clone of FCA recognised product and UK registered company)

Address: 2nd Floor, Berkeley Square House, London W1J 6BD

Telephone: 020 3995 2979 

Email: [email protected], [email protected], [email protected] 

Website: www.ipo-fx.co.uk 

Be aware that the scammers may give out other false details or mix these with some correct details of the registered firm.

FCA recognised product details

This FCA recognised product that fraudsters are claiming to work for has no association with the ‘clone firm’. It is authorised to offer, promote or sell services or products in the UK and its correct details are:

Product Name: Fundamental Index Emerging Markets Equity Fund

Product  Reference Number: 692562

UK registered company details

The UK registered company that fraudsters are claiming to work for has no association with the ‘clone firm’. Its correct details are:

Firm Name: Skylon Investments Limited
Company Number: 07757617
Address: Carina House West Linford Wood Business Park, Sunrise Parkway, Linford Wood, Milton Keynes MK14 6LS

How to protect yourself

We strongly advise you to only deal with financial firms that are authorised by us, and check the Financial Services Register to ensure they are. It has information on firms and individuals that are, or have been, regulated by us.

If a firm does not appear on the Register but claims it does, contact our Consumer Helpline on 0800 111 6768.

There are more steps you should take to avoid scams and unauthorised firms.

If you use an unauthorised firm, you won’t have access to the Financial Ombudsman Service or Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS) so you’re unlikely to get your money back if things go wrong.

If you use an authorised firm, access to the Financial Ombudsman Service and FSCS protection will depend on the investment you are making and the service the firm is providing. If you would like further information about protection, the authorised firm should be able to help.  

Report a clone firm

If you think you have been approached by an unauthorised or clone firm, or contacted about a scam, you should contact us. If you were offered, bought or sold shares, you can use our reporting form.

What to do if your firm is cloned

If you think your authorised firm has been cloned or scammers are fraudulently using your name or other details, contact our Firm Helpline on 0300 500 0597.

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WVH Ethical / WVH Wealth Management / WVH Sustainable Portfolios (clone of EEA authorised firm)

Almost all firms and individuals carrying out financial services activities in the UK have to be authorised or registered by us. This firm is not authorised or registered by us but has been targeting people in the UK, claiming to be an authorised firm.

This is what we call a ‘clone firm’; and fraudsters usually use this tactic when contacting people out of the blue, so you should be especially wary if you have been cold called. They may use the name of the genuine firm, the ‘firm reference number’ (FRN) we have given the authorised firm or other details.

You can find out more about this scam tactic and how to protect yourself from clone firms.

Clone firm details

Fraudsters are using or giving out the following details as part of their tactics to scam people in the UK:

WVH Ethical / WVH Wealth Management / WVH Sustainable Portfolios (clone of EEA authorised firm)

Address: 5 Canada Square, Canary Wharf, London, E14 5AQ

Telephone: +44 2031293417 

Email: [email protected], [email protected], [email protected] 

Website: www.wvhethical.com, www.wvh-clients.com, www.wvhadvisors.com, www.wvh-login.com

Be aware that the scammers may give out other false details or mix these with some correct details of the registered firm.

FCA authorised firm details

This FCA authorised firm that fraudsters are claiming to work for has no association with the ‘clone firm’. It is authorised to offer, promote or sell services or products in the UK and its correct details are:

Firm Name: Walter Van Hoecke (EEA Authorised)

Firm Reference Number: 620126

Address: Assenedesteenweg 126 101, Zelzate, 9060, BELGIUM

How to protect yourself

We strongly advise you to only deal with financial firms that are authorised by us, and check the Financial Services Register to ensure they are. It has information on firms and individuals that are, or have been, regulated by us.

If a firm does not appear on the Register but claims it does, contact our Consumer Helpline on 0800 111 6768.

There are more steps you should take to avoid scams and unauthorised firms.

If you use an unauthorised firm, you won’t have access to the Financial Ombudsman Service or Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS) so you’re unlikely to get your money back if things go wrong.

If you use an authorised firm, access to the Financial Ombudsman Service and FSCS protection will depend on the investment you are making and the service the firm is providing. If you would like further information about protection, the authorised firm should be able to help.  

Report a clone firm

If you think you have been approached by an unauthorised or clone firm, or contacted about a scam, you should contact us. If you were offered, bought or sold shares, you can use our reporting form.

What to do if your firm is cloned

If you think your authorised firm has been cloned or scammers are fraudulently using your name or other details, contact our Firm Helpline on 0300 500 0597.

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Global regulation, local solutions | FCA

Speaker: Nausicaa Delfas, Executive Director of International
Event: BCLP, London
Delivered: 23 January 2020
Note: this is the speech as drafted and may differ from delivered version

Highlights

  • Brexit withdrawal agreement
  • Bilateral engagement and financial dialogues

This is a timely opportunity for me to cover our approach to international regulation, and our next steps on Brexit, as we due to leave the EU in a week’s time, and to enter the implementation period.

The theme of your conference is “global regulation, local solutions”. 

Global regulation is crucial to ensuring firms can compete on a level playing field across jurisdictions, and to reducing opportunities for regulatory arbitrage. 

But in practice, the reality is international regulation will always have a local element, and solutions have to be tailored to local markets to achieve the right outcome.  And ultimately outcomes are what matter most.

National authorities need to be able to do what is right in their jurisdiction rather than rigidly applying identical requirements country-by-country.

And of course, regulation has to have a local element for practical reasons.

For example, requirements around mind and management reflect the importance of local accountability for decisions taken locally.

Or the need for documentation to be in local languages or otherwise suited to the culture of the local market.

However, these local solutions can cause higher compliance costs for firms operating internationally. The need for a local element shouldn’t be used as a blanket justification for local implementation that leads to inconsistent outcomes or increased costs for firms or their clients.

We can and want to do more to reduce these burdens, and are taking pragmatic approaches to achieve this where we can. 

The FCA has, along with all other UK authorities, consistently argued for broader and stronger international standards. Since the financial crisis and with the creation of the Financial Stability Board (FSB) over a decade ago, UK policymakers have been at the forefront of establishing standards for example the regulation of benchmarks, banking and insurance capital requirements, and resolution regimes.

Both the UK and the EU have committed to outcomes preserving financial stability, market integrity, investor and consumer protection and fair competition

Ten years on, we should take stock of where we are – and consider not just what has been implemented but how.The quality and consistency of local implementation is critical to the success of these reforms.

The FSB’s latest annual evaluation found a ‘high level’ of implementation in a number of areas, including those rules relating to Bank capital and liquidity. It also found ‘near full compliance’ in areas such as compensation rules and derivative trade reporting.  

But there is more work to be done to ensure implementation is consistent, both in the form and adoption timetable of international standards. In his latest letter to G20 Ministers, the FSB Chair Randal Quarles reiterated that work on the G20 reforms was ‘far from complete.’

Addressing uneven progress and ensuring reforms are working as intended remains a priority.  

Evidence of the commitment to this can be found in the ongoing international focus on market fragmentation, which remains a priority of both the International Organization of Securities Commissions (IOSCO) and the FSB’s agendas.

The risks of market fragmentation are well known: increased costs for firms, potentially weaker or complex oversight for regulators, and opportunities for firms to engage in regulatory arbitrage.

The IOSCO market fragmentation report, released last summer, looked at areas of uneven implementation such as trade reporting requirements and the problems caused by variations in data field format and scope.

On the same topic, the FSB also considered the problem in relation to cyber risks and stress testing.

So avoiding needless fragmentation is now a key part of policy making. For example, on the emergence of so-called stablecoins, the FSB and IOSCO, as well as other international organisations, have launched dedicated workstreams to facilitate open discussion and information exchange between regulators, encourage a coordinated approach, and ensure that local action is informed by international thinking.   

International work on market fragmentation has the potential to realise significant benefits for authorities and firms. We will play our part in encouraging practical solutions to these issues.

Brexit 

The work on market fragmentation will take on a new dimension as the UK leaves the EU, as it is clear that Brexit will bring about a number of changes for our firms and markets.

With the withdrawal agreement between the UK and the EU now likely to be passed, this will mean that:

  • A “no deal” exit will not happen at the end of January 2020 and we will enter an implementation period.
  • EU law will continue to apply throughout 2020, and passporting will continue as now during that time. Consumers’ rights and protections will also remain unchanged.

It also means that:

  • The UK and the EU will begin discussions on the future relationship including the Political Declaration commitments to conduct mutual equivalence assessments by mid-2020.
  • Firms still need to ensure they are prepared for a range of scenarios that may happen at the end of 2020 – and this includes the scenario in which the activities they conduct might not be covered by agreements reached between the UK and the EU.
  • As we have done over the past three years, we will keep firms and consumers updated during 2020.

Of course, our future trading relationship with the EU is still to be negotiated and agreed, and we are just at the beginning.

We stand ready to provide technical advice, in line with our objectives to Government on any Free Trade agreements it negotiates with the EU.

Commentators sometimes suggest that we will have either “equivalence” with EU rules, or diverge. The reality is not so binary. For countries independently assessing eachother for equivalence, they will generally not start with the same set of rules.

The key question for any assessment of any third country is ‘Do the rules achieve equivalent outcomes?’. As stated in the Political Declaration, both the UK and the EU have committed to outcomes preserving financial stability, market integrity, investor and consumer protection and fair competition.

Our work to onshore the EU rulebook means that on day one, the UK will have the most equivalent framework to the EU of any country in the world. This provides a strong basis for the EU and UK to find each other equivalent across the full range of equivalence provisions.

And in future, it is not about whether we have identical rules, but whether they achieve common substantive outcomes. This is the established model currently used by the EU and it’s an approach we strongly support. 

And we believe that equivalence decisions should be based on technical assessments. By grounding equivalence decisions firmly in an understanding of the other jurisdiction’s regulatory regime, we ensure stability and transparency for all involved.

A conclusion that the other party’s regulation does not provide the same substantive outcomes, must also be open to reasonable challenge and therefore be given with appropriate warning. And any resulting changes to market access must also be consistent with those objectives. 

The UK will have the most equivalent framework to the EU of any country in the world. This provides a strong basis for the EU and UK to find each other equivalent across the full range of equivalence provisions.

We also recognise that the current equivalence regime does not provide for access in some key areas. As both the UK and EU are committed to open markets, there is also a strong rationale for both sides to discuss broadening their respective equivalence frameworks. 

We should also consider how we can best cooperate at a supervisory level, to provide comfort about firms which may be doing cross border business, whether under equivalence or a national regime.

Bilateral engagement and financial dialogues

Now to look to the future, and forging new relationships with the EU and the rest of the world.

Regardless of where we end up, the FCA will continue to engage with the future EU agenda. This is because we share common regulatory and supervisory priorities, challenges and concerns. This includes such areas as next steps with EU Capital Markets Union, where building strong and open capital markets is in the interests of Europe as a whole.

It includes investor protection standards, sustainable finance, the fight against money laundering, financial innovation and the future regulation of crypto assets – some of which I see are covered in your “emerging themes” published today.

The FCA is a global regulator and many of the markets and firms we regulate are global. We support open markets underpinned by strong international standards. This will not change when we leave the EU, and our focus on international cooperation and standard setting will increase.

As well as our multilateral engagement through standard setting bodies such as the FSB and IOSCO, we have developed a strong programme of bi-lateral engagement to shape international standards and best practice.

For example, we participate in a number of Government-led Financial Dialogues with regulators from several major global financial centres, such as Singapore, Japan and US.

We will continue to work closely with Treasury as they develop their global engagement agenda.

This will include ways in which we can enhance our regulatory cooperation with key jurisdictions and explore options for new mechanisms for cross border market access.

The FCA is a global regulator and many of the markets and firms we regulate are global. We support open markets underpinned by strong international standards.

A recent example where the FCA has taken forward work to support market access is the Mutual Recognition of Funds agreement we signed with the Hong Kong Securities and Futures Commission. 

It supports reciprocal access to each other’s jurisdiction for the marketing and distribution of investment funds covered by the scheme.

The agreement was made on the basis that Hong Kong and UK rules aim to achieve equivalent outcomes to each other.

Close and ongoing regulatory cooperation is key to the success of this scheme, and other similar market access arrangements. We therefore support HM Treasury’s aim of deepening cooperation with other financial centres.

Conclusion

Without doubt, we face another interesting year ahead. We in the FCA are preparing ourselves for all scenarios. We are ready to adapt to the new environment post Brexit. 

But some things won’t change.

We have always been an international regulator in outlook, regulating global markets with a strong focus on consumer protection. We will continue to engage and lead debates at the global level.

We will continue to work closely with our EU partners. And we will continue to evolve our approach to regulation. Whether it be for new issues that are arising such as sustainable finance or crypto assets, or for existing regulation and how we move to more outcomes based models of regulation as we have talked about in recent months.

And so I finish where I started. We will continue to promote global solutions to policy problems. 

And we will continue to work to ensure that where local solutions are needed, we pursue a pragmatic and risk based approach.

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Financial Services AI Public Private Forum

In response to this and increasing data availability, the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) and the Bank of England (BoE) have committed to undertake work to better understand how these developments are driving change in financial markets, including business models, products, services and consumer engagement.

In October 2019, the FCA and the BoE published a report on the application of AI/ML in UK financial services. This report constituted a first step towards better understanding the impact of ML on UK financial services.

Building on this, the FCA and the BoE are establishing a forum to further constructive dialogue with the public and private sectors to better understand the use and impact of AI/ML, including the potential benefits and constraints to deployment, as well as the risks associated with the application of AI/ML.

The Financial Services AI Public Private Forum (AIPPF) will explore means to support safe adoption of these technologies within financial services, and whether principles, guidance, regulation and/or industry good practice could support safe adoption of AI/ML.

More specifically the Forum seeks to:

  • Share information and understand the practical challenges of using AI and ML within financial services, as well as the barriers to deployment and potential risks.
  • Gather views on potential areas where principles, guidance or good practice examples could be useful in supporting safe adoption of these technologies.
  • Consider whether ongoing industry input could be useful and what form this could take.

Participation in the AIPPF is at the invitation of the FCA and BoE, and includes firms active in the development of artificial intelligence (and use of machine learning), alongside public authorities and academics. The selection process is set out in the Terms of Reference.

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Andrew Bailey calls on tech giants to collaborate with the FCA to help protect consumers

In an exclusive Inside FCA Podcast interview where he looks back at challenges and achievements of the past year, Andrew Bailey also reflects on his time as Chief Executive and focuses on current issues, calling on large technology companies to work with the regulator to help protect consumers.

“We would like much more assistance from the big internet service companies, particularly Google, to be prepared to establish an evidential standard by which if that evidential standard is met, they take down very quickly promotions that we identify to them are frauds or misleading”, he says.

Talking specifically about ‘transformation’ of the FCA, he emphasises the ongoing work to reform the organisation, including its approach to data.

He also highlights the unique remit of the FCA, which he believes will become more important in future as the UK prepares to leave the European Union. He goes on to emphasise the importance of this work and its role in helping society.

“I think the main thing is to remember that we’re doing a very important job, we’re doing a hard job, nobody ever said it was easy, we didn’t come here to do an easy thing. I think that’s part of the great challenge and part of the great fascination of the FCA.”

 

Listen to the Podcast

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